Where’s the evidence? Here actually…

Understandably, and thankfully, health professionals rely on evidence rather than hapchance, hope and incantations at the moon. Also understandably, they are often suspicious of the claims made for co-production, particularly if they have faced a full-frontal evangelical enthusiasm overdose from either of us. So, from all vantage points, it’s really useful to have an in-depth evaluation of the impact of co-pro on people’s health and well-being. And they seldom come more in-depth than the recent Spice evaluation of the impact of co-production across a range of time-credit initiatives in England and Wales: over 1300 people participated during a two-year period. Given that time credits are referenced in the Social Services & Wellbeing Act and in Prudent Healthcare as a key approach to co-produced and citizen-led services, this report couldn’t be more timely. Headline figures are impressive: 65% of participants said that their quality of life had improved; 45% felt healthier; 19% visited the doctor less often; 71% had made new friends and 76% felt able to contribute more to their community. Significantly, 48% of public service organisations involved reported that they were able to offer improved access to services with the same or fewer resources. Read the full report or check out the executive summary.

http://www.justaddspice.org/images/stories/downloads/article/103/xSpice%20Apteligen%20Report_Electronic_Dec2014.pdf

http://www.justaddspice.org/images/stories/downloads/article/103/Spice%20Evaluation%20Report_Executive%20Summary%20Final_Electronic.pdf

Advertisements

Spice Time credits – an evaluation

Spice, the social enterprise dedicated to developing agency timebanking systems, has published a two year evaluation of their time credits model. Results suggest that time credits have a positive impact on individuals and communities with 65% of Spice members reporting that their quality of life has improved; 45% of people saying they feel healthier and 49% less isolated. The evaluation also found that time credits are an effective way of engaging new people in their communities and generating more active citizenship and participation, as well as helping to create a more regular and reliable volunteer base.

http://www.justaddspice.org/news/103-making-an-impact-spice-launches-evaluation-report.html

Social Value Toolkit

Uscreates has launched a downloadable, interactive toolkit that can help you get the most out of Social Value measurement. The toolkit offers tips from hands-on, practitioner experience to make Social Value meaningful to stakeholders, and includes handy worksheets, video interviews and case studies.

http://uscreates.com/2014/07/24/introducing-the-social-value-measurement-toolkit/

(via Forum for the Future)

https://www.forumforthefuture.org/

Does it Work? A guide to evaluating community capacity initiatives

This guide has been developed to help you evaluate your project/service and the impact it might be having on “social capital”. It guides you through the things you need to consider before you start, then suggests and describes some appropriate methods depending on why you want to do the evaluation and who it is for.

http://www.thinklocalactpersonal.org.uk/_library/Resources/BCC/Does_it_work.pdf

Measuring health and social care coordination: new research and recommendations

Measuring health and social care coordination: new research and recommendations

Picker Institute Europe, in partnership with National Voices, has published two linked research reports describing how patients’, service users’ and carers’ perspectives can be used to measure integration within and between health and social care services.  Together, the reports describe a robust and efficient approach to measuring people’s experiences of integrated care, and provide valuable resources for those evaluating local and national initiatives.

http://www.nationalvoices.org.uk/measuring-health-and-social-care-coordination-new-research-recommendations